What Can I Learn From Census Records?

Census records are a great resource for genealogist.  When I began researching, I had to go to the library and search individual microfilms.  Today with the advance in technology, Ancestry.com makes it easy to search for and find an individual … Continued

Genealogy Friday: Why Are Census Records Such a Great Asset

Census records are a wonderful resource for the family historian.               Often the census records are the only resource you may be able to find on your family. Census records have become very easy to search and are a great … Continued

Genealogy Friday: Fun Activities for a Family Reunion

Pie Eating contest—see who can eat a pie the fastest {or substitute another food such as hotdog or pizza}. Family Auction—everyone brings an item to be bid on {you could also do this as a silent auction}.  The money that … Continued

Great Ideas to Make Your Family Reunion More Memorable

Tour the Past—I held a reunion one year at the church where the grandparents of all present were buried.  We also took a 10 minute journey to the cemetery where the parents of origin parents and grandparents were buried.  In … Continued

Genealogy Friday: Don’t Forget Census Records

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Census Records are a great resource for discovering more about your family.  Census records are conducted every 10 years in the United States {on years that end in 0, such as 2000 and 2010}. Census records are released in the … Continued

Genealogy Friday: Writing Dates in the Family History

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Often when tracing your family history, you will see dates written various ways.  Let’s take a look at some of the things you may see. In the United States dates are written mm/dd/yyyy   {month/day/year} In the United Kingdom dates are … Continued

Genealogy Friday: Interviews Can Lead to More Information in Family History

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Now that you’ve written out everything you know and gone through your pictures, interview older family members to begin piecing together the missing pieces.  Make a list of questions to ask and allow these older members to help you fill … Continued