Genealogy Friday: Keeping the Memory Alive

Daddy died before my niece and nephews were born.  But, we try to take the time to tell the children about him.

I was pleasantly surprised recently when one of my nephews referred to him and even recognized his picture, although he had to be reminded this was his Grandpa and not his uncle.

So, what are some ways to tell children about loved ones that have already passed on?

Share pictures of loved one
  1. Share pictures—let them see pictures around the house and/or in a photo album. If you have them show pictures that were taken of the two of them together.
  2. Share stories—share family stories that may relate to this loved one. This may not be all the time, but when something reminds you of that person tell the children.  Recently I told my nephew that a song we were listening to was one Daddy would often sing.
  3. Share memorabilia—if you have video, audio, items made by that person, items related to that individual, then be sure to share that also and why that item is important.
  4. Introduce to special places—if there is a place that was special to you and that individual, then share that with the children.
  5. Write a letter—sit down and write a letter together to that loved one, telling them how much you miss them and what is going on in your life or share a favorite memory
  6. Make a present—make a present for the loved one. Something that would have been special to them and mattered.
  7. DIY—make a project including picture or memorabilia of your loved one. Discuss what you want to make and why.
  8. Leave a place of honor—at family gatherings leave a place of honor for your loved one. The person is not able to be there in person but can be in spirit.  This is especially true for holidays and other special times to the family.
  9. Write a story–about a special time, event, honor of the loved one or a lesson the loved one taught to you or someone else.

Remember, this is about slowly introducing the next generation to a family member of keeping an individuals memory alive after passing.  Not every visit has to have a discussion, but from time to time, as the situation allows share these memories.

How have you introduced a loved one that has passed on to the next generation?